Skip to Content

Welcome to DrugSense

This is a web portal for DrugSense - Media Awareness Project (MAP) - Drug Policy Central (DPC)

Donate Now!DrugSense is an award winning (501)(c)(3) non-profit organization incorporated in 1995 to inform citizens and encourage involvement in drug policy reform.

It has developed a number of projects and services that have become a foundation for drug policy reform. The Media Awareness Project (MAP) Drug News Archive encourages unbiased media coverage, online media activism and a drug policy research tool. Drug Policy Central's Web-based services provides subsidized technical services for drug policy organizations organization to empower their members to organize and share information and resources.   Read more

Drug War Clock

Time 
Federal 
State 
Total 
Arrests 

Request for Support for DrugSense and MAP Inc.

Dear Drug Policy Reform Supporter,

We at DrugSense and MAPinc hope you have are having a prosperous and enjoyable 2019 that continues through the coming year.

As has been the case for many years, continued support of DrugSense/MAP Inc. has been a vital factor in what we consider to be one of the best investments in the drug policy reform effort that we are aware of. On a relatively small budget, we continue to provide an impressive array of features and support for a wide ranging group of organizations and individuals that are active throughout the drug policy reform arena.

Hopefully this report will provide something of an overview of what DrugSense/MAP inc. has been doing for the reform community for more than 25 Years!

Over the years, we have evolved into a very multifaceted organization. This makes it difficult to concisely enumerate all of the many and varied services we provide the drug policy reform community but, hopefully, I can provide a pretty convincing overview without taking too much of your time.



News

US CA: Marijuana On The Job: Some New Twists In Drug Testing
Three years after recreational marijuana was legalized in California, it still casts a cloud over most job applicants.
US MN: Minnesota Study Links Pot Use In Pregnancy To Infant Health
Researchers hope the findings counter recent trends of mothers using marijuana for pregnancy-related nausea symptoms.
US: Marijuana Psychosis Treatment Tough To Find For Young People
When Garrett Rigg moved from a "transitional living program" facility near Chicago last month into a group home, it was a major milestone for the 27-year-old, who traveled 1,000 miles from his home in Denver to get treatment after a cannabis-induced psychotic break five years ago.
US: The Human Cost Of Marijuana Is So High
I've covered things that injure, sicken and kill kids and adults for more than 30 years. From auto safety to medical errors, I've competed to break stories on the latest deadly defect or health policy change, most recently on electronic cigarettes.

Opinions

US: Editorial: The Vaping-Marijuana Nexus
A surge in vaping related lung illnesses this year caught the medical community by surprise, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting more than 2,500 lung illnesses and 54 deaths. Politicians are targeting e-cigarettes, but the CDC reported last week that marijuana is so far the greatest common denominator.
US: OPED: Why The U.K. Isn't Having Problems With Vaping
The Volstead Act prohibiting intoxicating beverages became law on October 28, 1919-a century ago this week-and came into force a few months later. Most people now agree that Prohibition was a failure, driving the alcohol industry underground, where its products became unsafe, its profits lucrative and tax-free, and its methods violent. Most countries have since taken the view that it is better to legalize, regulate and tax drink than to ban it.
US: OPED: Pot Legalization Makes Vaping Deadly
Doctors have linked a tragic wave of lung injuries and deaths to the vaping of tainted marijuana concentrates. The episode reveals the dangers created by the federal government's decadelong refusal to challenge state laws legalizing pot and promoting risky uses of its derivatives.
US: OPED: Do We Really Want A Microsoft Of Marijuana?
The legalization of marijuana as a medicine in 33 states, 11 of which allow its use as a recreational drug, has made weed a dynamic American industry, among the economy's fastest-growing sources of new jobs. California alone, with $3.1 billion in projected marijuana sales for this year, has a legal market as large as that of any country on the planet.

Letters

US: The Majority Agree With Policy Reform
One in five Americans reside in a jurisdiction where the adult use of cannabis is legal under state statute, and the majority of citizens reside some place where the medical use of cannabis is legally authorized. Many of these latter programs have been in place for the better part of two decades.
US: The Gateway Theory Is A Joke
"Is Marijuana Fueling a Public-Health Crisis?" The statistic from your editorial, that "95% of heroin and cocaine users report first using pot," doesn't prove much. Remember, 99% of criminal motorcycle-gang members started by riding bicycles.
US: Prohibition Is The Problem, Not Marijuana
It is difficult to keep track of the fallacies and straw men in your reefer madness rant. Start with the obvious: The federal ban on cannabis makes it impossible for legal, federally regulated e-cigarette makers to develop and market safe THC cartridges for vaping. Consequently, most THC cartridges are dangerous bootleg products sold on the black market. Federal legalization would lead to improved product safety for which manufacturers would be held accountable.
US: Legal, Regulated Pot Is The Answer To Vaping Deaths
I'm sorry to say that Dr. Scott Gottlieb has it completely backward ("Pot Legalization Makes Vaping Deadly," op-ed, Oct. 11). The correct way to fix the problem of poisonous THC vaping is to legalize and regulate it.
US: Candidates Need To Address Drug War
Having lost a son to heroin use, I want to ask the following of the candidates: Our "war on drugs," declared by President Nixon in 1971, is a dismal failure. The historian Alfred McCoy wrote recently in The Nation that "instead of reducing the traffic, the drug war has actually helped stimulate that ninefold increase in global opium production and a parallel surge in U.S. heroin users, from just 68,000 in 1970 to 886,000 in 2017." Drug deaths reached 192 a day in 2017, with many of them between the ages of 12 and 25. That is a silent Parkland =85 every day. What is your solution to this catastrophe?
US: Addicts Need Help
Re "Ending the War on Drugs," by Nicholas Kristof (Sunday Review, Aug. 25): This article gives me hope that Seattle is finally doing something about the devastation of drug use on its streets.
US: No Progress In Heroin Epidemic
Wow! Are you kidding me? This is the most fantasized assessment of Seattle's drug epidemic I've ever seen. In actuality, we are spiraling toward complete social meltdown here, and Nicholas Kristof thinks we've figured out how to end the war on drugs?