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Welcome to DrugSense

This is a web portal for DrugSense - Media Awareness Project (MAP) - Drug Policy Central (DPC)

Donate Now!DrugSense is an award winning (501)(c)(3) non-profit organization incorporated in 1995 to inform citizens and encourage involvement in drug policy reform.

It has developed a number of projects and services that have become a foundation for drug policy reform. The Media Awareness Project (MAP) Drug News Archive encourages unbiased media coverage, online media activism and a drug policy research tool. Drug Policy Central's Web-based services provides subsidized technical services for drug policy organizations organization to empower their members to organize and share information and resources.   Read more

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Request for Support for DrugSense and MAP Inc.

Dear Drug Policy Reform Supporter,

We at DrugSense and MAPinc hope you have are having a prosperous and enjoyable 2019 that continues through the coming year.

As has been the case for many years, continued support of DrugSense/MAP Inc. has been a vital factor in what we consider to be one of the best investments in the drug policy reform effort that we are aware of. On a relatively small budget, we continue to provide an impressive array of features and support for a wide ranging group of organizations and individuals that are active throughout the drug policy reform arena.

Hopefully this report will provide something of an overview of what DrugSense/MAP inc. has been doing for the reform community for more than 25 Years!

Over the years, we have evolved into a very multifaceted organization. This makes it difficult to concisely enumerate all of the many and varied services we provide the drug policy reform community but, hopefully, I can provide a pretty convincing overview without taking too much of your time.



News

US AZ: Forget Arizona's Cactuses, It's Now About The Weed
PHOENIX - When Arizonans voted to legalize recreational cannabis in November, it seemed plausible that sales would begin sometime in the spring.
US NY: With Marijuana Deal, New York Could Create $4 Billion Industry
State lawmakers finalized a deal on Thursday to legalize recreational marijuana in New York, paving the way for a potential $4.2 billion industry that could create tens of thousands of jobs and become one of the largest markets in the country.
US: Senior Happy Hour Goes Up In Smoke
For years, Harry B. Lebowitz spent the cocktail hour at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., sitting in his backyard overlooking a lake and smoking a joint while his partner relaxed with her vodka and club soda.
US: Column: Can Magic Mushrooms Heal Us?
Gov. Kate Brown of Oregon announced the members of the state's newly formed Psilocybin Advisory Board this week. Why does Oregon need an official board to offer advice about the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, you ask? Because Oregon is about to become the first state in the country to try to build a support infrastructure through which psychedelic mushrooms can be woven into everyday life. This framework is different from what we've seen before: not legalization, not medicalization, but therapeutic use, in licensed facilities, under the guidance of professionals trained to guide psychedelic experiences. Whoa.

Opinions

US AZ: Forget Arizona's Cactuses, It's Now About The Weed
PHOENIX - When Arizonans voted to legalize recreational cannabis in November, it seemed plausible that sales would begin sometime in the spring.
US NY: With Marijuana Deal, New York Could Create $4 Billion Industry
State lawmakers finalized a deal on Thursday to legalize recreational marijuana in New York, paving the way for a potential $4.2 billion industry that could create tens of thousands of jobs and become one of the largest markets in the country.
US: Senior Happy Hour Goes Up In Smoke
For years, Harry B. Lebowitz spent the cocktail hour at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., sitting in his backyard overlooking a lake and smoking a joint while his partner relaxed with her vodka and club soda.
US: Column: Can Magic Mushrooms Heal Us?
Gov. Kate Brown of Oregon announced the members of the state's newly formed Psilocybin Advisory Board this week. Why does Oregon need an official board to offer advice about the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, you ask? Because Oregon is about to become the first state in the country to try to build a support infrastructure through which psychedelic mushrooms can be woven into everyday life. This framework is different from what we've seen before: not legalization, not medicalization, but therapeutic use, in licensed facilities, under the guidance of professionals trained to guide psychedelic experiences. Whoa.

Letters

US OR: Let's See What Happens
Mr. Fallon's letter highlights one of the unappreciated strengths of our federal republic when compared with most other countries:
US OR: Oregon Abandons Its Youth With New Law
It's disingenuous of Seamus R. Fallon ("Oregon Drug Law Change Can Help Families," Letters, Nov. 24) to insist that two grams of cocaine is one-third the amount a drug dealer would typically carry. What is the source for such a statement? Based on my experience as a high-school teacher, few of the drug users in their teen years are "drug dealers." They are constant consumers, many on a daily basis, of stimulants of any kind. Two grams of cocaine is easily quartered for four classmates to afford a half-gram each, plenty to get amped up, behind some brewskis, especially for diminutive teen girls. None of the group is "a dealer" in the sense Mr. Fallon proffers his straw man; they are end-users for the dealers.
US: Oregon Drug Law Change Can Help Families
Naomi Schaefer Riley and John Walters state that Oregon decriminalized "small amounts of harder drugs, including cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine" ("Legal Drugs Are Fashionable-and Treacherous for Children," op-ed, Nov. 19) and that the passage of Measure 110 in Oregon "lower[s] the risk and cost of doing business for drug dealers." It's an erroneous claim. Measure 110 says that possession of less than one gram of heroin, various low amounts of amphetamines and less than two grams of cocaine is decriminalized. No drug dealer would carry anything less than three times the amounts in the measure.
US GA: Drug War Puts Brave Police Officers In Dangerous Spot
The drug war needs to end. If the AJC investigated, it would likely find most of the violence is drug war-related. The police are doing the job they were given. You may not like the way they do it, but do not blame them for doing their highly dangerous job. Either make drugs legal, or let the government compete with the drug lords by taking confiscated drugs and giving them free to drug addicts in a special recovery program. If drugs are free or legal, there is no reason for drug lords to exist. They cannot compete with free. This is the way to end most of the violence and social injustice. Not all of it, I am sorry to say, but it would be a start.
US: Black Parents Can't Indulge
Re "Parents' Little Helpers" (Sunday Styles, Oct. 4): To be a Black mother is to be in a constant state of alertness when it comes to protecting your family from the government. As a Black woman, mother and lawyer, I am no different in that regard.
CN AB: Harm Reduction Still An Effective Strategy
Like myself, I suspect many citizens of Lethbridge were alarmed by the finding of misappropriated funds within ARCHES, and the subsequent withdrawal of provincial funding to their supervised consumption site (SCS). As an RN who has worked for a number of years in harm reduction, I am reeling for our clients and their families in terms of how this will impact them.
US: Cities Want To Use Pot As A Cure-All
Give Marijuana Tax Revenues to the Harmed We have a moral imperative to try to right the wrongs of the war on drugs. We should start by investing in the very communities it harmed.